Do You Need to Physically See A Doctor to Get A Birth Control Prescription?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 62% of women of reproductive age are currently using contraception; only 28% use the pill in the United States.

Birth control remains one of the most popular ways for women to prevent pregnancy and regulate their menstrual cycles. Some doctors even recommend certain birth control pills to treat or prevent acne and to address other hormone-related conditions.

Over the past years, your social media feed probably has been flooded with ads for birth control subscription websites, such as Hers, Nurx, The pill club, or Simple health.

How Do the Subscription Websites Work?

The websites, also called telemedicine providers, allow users to upload photos and help get you in touch with licensed physicians so that you can have an online or in-person appointment to get a legitimate prescription for birth control medications.

They offer generic or brand name medications such as patch, ring, progestin-only pills, combination pills (progestin and estrogen), and emergency contraception (Plan B).

Most states now allow patients to fill a birth control prescription online, but if you happen to live somewhere that doesn’t, you’ll have to get a prescription by physically visiting a doctor.

Do I Need Any Exam Before Getting Birth Control Pills?

You should have pelvic exams and Pap tests based on your age and health history. But you don’t need an exam or Pap test just to get a prescription for birth control pills.

Before you get birth control pills, your doctor should always do a basic medical exam and:

  • Check your blood pressure.
  • Ask if you’ve ever had blood clots.
  • Ask if you smoke.

High blood pressure, blood clots, and smoking are risk factors. If you have a risk factor, birth control pills may not be a good choice and you should consider other forms of birth control.

However, you cannot get the exams listed above without physically seeing your doctor.

Where Is Your Personal Health Information Going?

Before you get medication or prescription from the subscription service websites, customers will be required to complete and submit an online health questionnaire. You will be answering many private questions, such as how many partners you have and have you had any sexually transmitted infections.

You will also need to provide a current form of ID including your name, home address, a scanned photo, as well as a recent blood pressure reading and other details of your medical history and symptoms. This should only take 10 minutes.

At the end of the questionnaire, you will be asked to provide payment information with your credit card or other options.

All of your information above is recorded and stored in your web browser cookies and on their servers. Do you know where your data is going? This information, not only goes to the subscription service websites, but also to their partner physicians and third-party pharmacies. Will your data be stored securely on all sites? Could your data ever be shared without your permission?

Do You Really Want Your Medications to Arrive Automatically Every Month?

Subscription websites automatically deliver medications to your door every month.  What if you need to wait a few days to prepare financially? Is there someone to call? Can you chat?  What if your prescription changes?  How soon do they require notification to stop the next order?

Most online pharmacies allow you to log into their website and place orders when you need them. Additionally, if you need to speak to someone to make changes, there is a patient care representative available to either walk you through the change or take care of the change on your behalf with the pharmacy. Your medication will only be billed and arrive when you request it. 

Most online pharmacies will also send you a reminder that your refill is due, so you don’t forget.  Additionally, there are usually options to email, text, or chat in order to refill a prescription or place a new order for medication. Customer service and convenience are incredibly important.

How Canadian Online Pharmacy Works?

After having a conversation with your family doctor or walk-in clinic doctor, you may get a prescription to start birth control.

Just call a Canadian online pharmacy and fax or mail your prescription. The pharmacy is licensed and regulated by the government for safety. There are no long and uncomfortable questionnaires and your data is kept secure.

At Canada Online Health, you can talk with a professional licensed pharmacist on the phone if you need more information on the medication. You will get discreet packaging and they also can send email reminders of the time to refill.  

Ordering from Canada Online Health is easy, no need to pay subscription or membership fees, there are no hidden fees, and the medication is affordable!

Prescription Birth Control Medications

References:

  • cdc.gov
  • choosingwisely.org
  • finvsfin.com

If you have questions about your prescription medications or any other medication, please contact our team at Canada Online Health by calling toll free 1-800-399-DRUG (3784). One of our patient representatives will be happy to assist you or transfer you to a licensed Canadian pharmacist for a free consultation.

This article contains medical information provided to help you better understand this medical condition or process and may contain information about medication often used as part of a treatment plan prescribed by a doctor.  It is not intended to be used as either a diagnosis or recommendation for treatment of your medical situation.  If you are unwell, concerned about your physical or mental state, or are experiencing symptoms you should speak with your doctor or primary health care provider. If you are in medical distress, please contact emergency services (such as 911).

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